Residential Film Protection in Winter Weather

Winter is often thought of as a break from the damaging summer sun, but in reality that isn’t at all the case.  While we certainly don’t feel the rays as much, the lower angle of the sun in the sky allows easier access through your windows and glass doors.  Winter sun actually causes greater damage to walls, artwork, rugs and furniture – especially since folks are more inclined to open up their shades and let the light in.  Fortunately, residential window film can protect your valuables from UV rays while still allowing natural light to illuminate your home.

With the beautiful snow this time of year (much more appealing than March snow) no one would admonish the desire to let that glow light up your home.  But that “snow glow” can have the same type of damaging effect as that of water reflection at a lake house – walls, moldings, and even ceilings are vulnerable to reflected UV corruption.  Since our Panorama films offer top of the line UV protection with high visible light transmission, UV protection doesn’t have to mean closing your blinds and turning on the lamp, or feeling like you live in a pair of sunglasses.

It may seem that you have already missed out on “residential tint season”, but that isn’t the case – most residential film products can be applied in winter weather.  But while it could theoretically work out just fine on those freezing days, we prefer to install when the temperature is above 30 degrees.  This isn’t just for the comfort of our installers (they are rather resilient) but because the film takes longer to cure in colder weather.

Window film also does it’s part in helping to keep out the cold on those blustery days.  One of the Panorama films in the Solar Gard line offers serious insulation value to your window glass as well as highly effective UV protection, helping you save in more ways than one.  This can be a extra benefit to areas like western New York where we tend to run our heat all winter and our air conditioner all summer, with only a  brief hiatus from the energy bills.

If  you have any questions about how residential window film can help protect your home, call our shop any time – we would be glad to help you figure out which film best suits your needs.

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Window Tinting at Home – Protection with No Need for Low-E

People often regard residential window tinting as they would applying foil to your windows –  it may keep the rays out, but it just doesn’t look nice.  Many neighborhood associations have even taken the step to set guidelines that prohibit residential tint.  But the truth is that putting film on your home’s windows can protect your home and save energy, without giving your home the mirrored sunglass look, or any look at all for that matter!

With a variety of films that are protective, yet invisible from the outside, even homeowners in communities with strict HOA policies have options for insulating and preserving without any change in appearance.  One of the most popular films lately is our optically clear, polyester based Hilite film series by Panorama, which has unbeatable protection while being virtually imperceptible – both indoors and out.  Hilite films provide even greater solar energy protection without the reflective quality of the old mirror films.

And people thinking about replacing their decent insulated window units with Low-E or even Argon gas filled windows, might look to residential film for a more efficient and economical solution.  Some films have solar energy rejection rates higher than those offered by any of the modern gas filled window types.  And with the natural insulation that another layer can give you (think plastic sheets over the windows), residential films can make a bigger dent in the amount of energy traveling in and out through you windows.

Your choice in films can make a big difference in the effect on energy savings, as some films can actually store tons of heat, making the windows less efficient than they were before.  If you are wondering which film might be right for your home, check out the information on our site or more detailed information about the Hilite film, provided by Panorama.